Monday, 22 July 2013

More Big Pharma dirty tricks?

Check the allegations out

In clinical trials, Pharma controls the data 

They have been caught a number of times massaging the information to their benefit.

After a few scandals 

Pharma are opting or being made to open the information to all under pressure from the European Regulators. Much of Pharma is resisting this.

Now they have been caught trying to get Patient groups to lobby secretly on their behalf not to do this.

Bad Pharma caught again.... I bet they will be caught again


9 comments:

  1. "Drugs companies publish only a fraction of their results and keep much of the information to themselves,..."

    Professor, how much of this is true?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As they don't publish it, I don't know if it exists so couldn't possibly know..this is a quote from the Guardian...

      However I suspect this is the case. I know of my animal work done for pharma that has never seen the light of day...wonder why?


      Even in the lab we don't publish every thing...the case of the ejaculating mouse....which drug did this and it wasn't viagra.

      This information was not relevant to the study maybe we will work
      this one up for a future publication, but the drug is dead as far as MS goes. Some of the stuff I am publishing know was done years ago.

      In trials it can be much more serious and as pharma has been caught with its pants down a few times, they need to up their act and come clean.

      Pharma are very careful what data gets collected

      Delete
  2. "A recent review of medical research estimated that only half of all clinical trials were published in full, and that positive results were twice as likely to be published than negative ones." What would be the benefit from publishing negative data besides allowing researchers to identify a dead-end? Clinical trials in the U.S. are discontinued when end points are not reached due to efficacy or safety reasons.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What is the point of publishing negative data besides identifying a dead end.

    That is a very good reason, you don't want to make the same mistake twice and if there ever is a twice you learn from the negative study.

    The truth of the matter is that pharma/Neuros kill drugs that may work, because of trial design that make not be fit for purpose..their mistake and in some cases, in my opinion, their stupidity/naivity

    From a science prospective having the negative data would temper the enthusiasm for the trial in the first place because the idea on which the pillar is based is made of jelly/jello (US)

    Trials are discontinued when points of safety or efficacy are not reached.
    There is interim analysis in most trials for reasons of safety primarily surely one needs to establish that the drug is not working so it is clear it did not work. One trial on PPMS was cut short because the claim was the placebo were not progressing quick enough and the results buried for years.

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  4. Professor GG has been involved in drug trials, namely Cladribine and BG12. I would like to ask him:

    Has he been exposed to the whole volume of raw data OR the pharma-filtered data prior to signing the relevant published studies?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You will have to write very LOUD as I said, ProfG is on holiday, without a computer.

      He has been involved in a lot more studies

      Many people on scientific papers have not been exposed to the whole raw data set, so other studies will not be different.
      If you made a mouse used in the study you can be an authors but youd not ask for the raw figures, you assume your collaborators can use a computer

      Delete
    2. We have access to the data in the sense we can ask any questions. We don't have a copy of the database sitting on our computer. However the FDA does, it requests all the data so they can do their own analysis. The latter only applies to positive studies. We are in the process of setting up a contract with Merck-Serono to get a copy of the cladribine data.

      Delete
    3. Thank you for the response. Do you think that studying the original cladribine data may change your views on the drug?

      Delete
  5. My view is that heey made a mistake to withdraw it.

    ReplyDelete

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